understanding & evaluating others

How to Navigate the New Hiring Landscape

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By Ron Price

Hiring has become more important than ever. Today we are not simply filling a job, but instead asking people to balance complexity and deal with ever-present change. We are not only looking for someone who is going to fit into the job today, but also grow into additional roles in the future, due to the pace of change in the world.

Today’s workplace dynamic of low unemployment and increased worker mobility has resulted in employees who no longer feel loyalty to a company because companies are no longer loyal to them.

How to Define Success in Any Job

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By Ron Price

In my own experience as an executive, I sought to put as much power as possible into hands of those I supervised. I wanted them to “own” their jobs and to always know how to accurately evaluate their performance. Once I retired from corporate management and started supporting other leaders, I discovered they are equally interested in providing clarity to their subordinates and nurturing a higher level of accountability. This led to formalizing a process for defining and measuring executive performance.

My Personal Civil War: What Happens When Behaviors or Motivators Clash

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By Dave Clark

Some people call it an internal struggle. Others call it a “me-me” conflict. I like to call it my personal civil war. Many of us have one (or more) of these internal conflicts and they tend to cause us mental anguish, often on a daily basis.

The Leader as Talent Agent

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Host Dale Dixon and Executive Advisor Ron Price explore the leader's role in finding and developing great talent for his or her organization. Ron lists ways that leaders can keep the hiring pipeline full, and how to make sure that a candidate is a good fit for the job and the organization. He discusses the importance of systemically evaluating, challenging and reorganizing your team. And also shares potential landmines.

5 Characteristics of Great Leaders

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By Dave Clark,

The hope of every employee is to work for a leader they like and respect. While each person may have their own definition of what constitutes a “great leader,” we can agree there are certain traits that appeal to the masses.

If you are a leader and you possess these five traits, you are probably quite successful. If you don’t think these traits describe your leadership style, working on one or more of these areas would be a great place to start in order to build a better rapport with your teams.

Humility

Are Your Assumptions Limiting Your Employees?

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Host Dale Dixon interviews Leadership Advisor Dr. Francis Eberle about his unique perspective on understanding and evaluating others. Dr. Eberle shares how being dyslexic impacted his education--and also the way he perceives others. He tells us why assumptions about people are detrimental for a leader, and gives simple tactics to be better at understanding and evaluating others.

Acres of Diamonds at Work

By Ron Price

There is an old story about a fellow in the ancient world, who upon learning about diamonds, sold his successful farm and spent his fortune traveling the world in search of the gems. Several years after he died, having never found the diamonds he sought, others discovered the largest diamond mine ever found—on the farm he had sold to begin his quest.

Hire the Right Candidate Every Time with These 3 Steps

Joe Smith seemingly has the whole package. He has a solid resume, great references, skills that showcase his expertise in his field and plenty of success stories to his credit. On paper, Joe seems like the ultimate “can’t miss” candidate. Joe looks the part and his appearance seems to match his resume.

Recognizing Other Perspectives

Understanding and evaluating others is the ability to see the individuality in others and to recognize a person’s unique point of view. TCL faculty member Ron Price shares his insights on this important leadership competency.

Make Your Team Better with DISC

By Whit Mitchell

Why do people lose their jobs? Managers hire for skill, but they rarely fire for incompetence. Instead they fire because of bad behavior. 

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