Why Self-Objectivity Matters in the Workplace

By Mindy Bortness

One of the most difficult things to achieve in the workplace is gaining objectivity, especially when it comes to self. Every individual is saddled with years of experiences, biases, and self-perceptions that make it difficult to look inward, and at others, for who they really are.

I’ve found, when a person strips away all of that baggage, they’re able to do something quite unique. This individual can see himself or herself more clearly. The newfound reality usually breeds a sense of gratefulness. When working with clients, I see them begin to see themselves for who they truly are and develop an appreciation, and relief, for how they’re wired.

Over my two decades in creating hiring intelligence and communication strategies for organizations, I hold “reality” as one of my core values. The foundation of reality comes from one important action: trust the data. Sometimes trusting the data is not so easy.

I worked with a woman who had a difficult time trusting the data. Interestingly, when she was completing the assessment, she self-reported that she was a person who was skeptical and was prone to ask many questions to gain information she could trust. Yet, when the data shined a mirror back on her, she initially rejected it. Aside from the science-based assessment she completed, she also had another point of data. She had her colleagues around her in a trusting environment to verify, using specific examples, that the data was correct. Her colleagues ultimately helped her be more objective and realize the data was correct. From there, she could make better choices as to when this trait served her and when it got in her way.

One of the amazing things about fostering a sense of reality in others is once a person has it, it can speak volumes. It can spark self-discovery, deepen self-respect and make a long-term impact on career growth. And that sense of relief that you-get-you. That may be one of the biggest gifts: Understanding that it’s really quite great to be you. Then you can use what you know about yourself to be an even better version as you more consciously grow.

This blog was reprinted with permission from Mindy. To learn more about Mindy and her work, visit www.communicationworksinc.com.

Header image by Lisa of Pexels.